afternoon, mid-winter

surrealist-art-7

55,575, Possessed. Tuesday was warm and sunny. After writing 638 words on a new scene in Possessed, bringing the Chapter 18 scene to 1,219 words, I took a walk to visit a recently met neighbor, a local artist who grew up on my street and only lives a few blocks from me. She’d invited me to drop by any time. The sunlit street beckoned and I had not been out of the house for days.

My street has old family homes built decades ago, each house different from its neighbor, lots of trees–the neighborhood is carved out of what was once mostly forest and pasture land, paved lanes whiskered with grass wind off into cul de sacs. My street runs straight into town, a less than fifteen-minute walk from my house. Arriving at the dark red bungalow home of my new acquaintance, I stepped up on the porch and rang the bell. Turns out she wasn’t home, but my walk wasn’t for nothing.

Now that the dust from my Great Move has settled, it was time to get a  library card. The Andalusia Public Library, a modern brick building that used to be the post office, sits at the end of my street, couldn’t ask for a more fortuitous location. The library used to be my home away from home in pre-Internet days, and I still like to have a library card. So got my card and did something I hadn’t done in a long time–browsed the fiction shelves, inhaling the scents of pages bound in cloth and cardboard.

I spent a few minutes reading half a dozen pages of Jean Auel’s Clan of the Cave Bear, which I’ve never read, and considered checking out. I tucked it in my elbow and wandered the aisle, looking at big-name writers, meeting certain titles like old friends. Coming across Evelyn Waugh’s Brideshead Revisited, I traded Auel for Waugh, the rhythm of Waugh’s prose having left an inspirational impression on my mind from a prior reading, and considering the stack of thick books on my living room lamp table, Auel’s book intimidated me in its length and I decided to let it be for another time. I could tell by the pacing of the prose it would be a slow read and I wasn’t ready for it quite yet. I walked home with Waugh tucked in hand.

On the way home I passed a tree heavy with lovely hanging droops of black berries, its branches flush with glossy green leaves. Don’t know what kind of tree it is but it was striking in its berried splendor, a boon to the many birds in the neighborhood.

I’m gradually getting the measure of place.